When was the last time you attended a worship service where you didn’t see the church leadership engaging? I bet it wasn’t that long ago. Whether you were at your own church, or someone else’s, you are bound to see this every once and a while. On the other hand, you may not have even noticed because this is more of an afterthought that you didn’t realize had any affect.

Last year the church I was leading at was in desperate need for space. We had many new guests each week but we weren’t retaining them. One of the main reasons was because we had hard plastic seats that weren’t very wide. This caused guests, and churched people as well, to be uncomfortable while sitting as there wasn’t enough space between seats, and sitting on hard chairs for a 40 minute message wasn’t appealing either. If a guest walks into your room and you have nowhere for them to sit, they aren’t going to stay. If a guest walks into your room and you have a place for them to sit, but it isn’t comfortable, they might stay but they won’t come back.

“If a guest walks into your room and you have a place for them to sit, but it isn’t comfortable, they might stay but they won’t come back.”

Throughout this process, one things was clear. Just because a person is uncomfortable or doesn’t want to come back, doesn’t mean that they know why they feel that way. When they leave your building their thought process may not be, “wow that chair was uncomfortable, do they really care about me?” Many times our feelings are based on an afterthought. We don’t realize why we felt that way until we really think about what caused that feeling in the first place.

Take a step back during a worship service at your church and think about what you see. Would you see your staff and leadership actively engaging in worship? Would you see them standing in the back, maybe talking to someone coming in who has approached them? The best one I’ve seen is when they are grabbing coffee at the coffee bar that tastes oh so good.

As leaders it is our job to lead. Sometimes I think we forget that. Whether you are on the stage or off, if you are on staff you are a worship leader. You may not be a worship leader to the same extent as the person with that actual title, in terms of Sunday morning, but people are looking to you to model how the church should worship. People go where their leadership takes them. If you have staff sitting on the back row and not engaging in worship, what do you think the rest of the church is going to do? Even if they are in the back row and engaging, no one is going to see them engaging. Don’t be a back row leader. If you are standing in the front row with all the other staff and you are engaging in worship, what do you think the rest of the church is going to do? They are far more likely to engage in worship.

“As leaders it is our job to lead. Sometimes I think we forget that.”

There are many reasons people may not be engaging in your service. Just like with the chairs, people are more than likely not going to realize what those reason are. That is okay! Don’t tell them it is because your leadership isn’t engaging, or that your worship leader had his eyes focused on sheet music the whole time. Instead, make sure to consistently cast vision to your team, your staff, and your pastors, as to the importance of leading by example during worship services. When the staff of your church catch and follow through with the vision of leading people to be engaged, you will see a complete difference in the environment of your worship services. As a worship leader, whether by title or not, it is our responsibility to lead people to engage with Christ.

Church staff; it is our job to create an engaging atmosphere of worship through
leading by example.

What ways could you help people engage better in your own church?

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